In Buddhist meditation the term ‘monkey mind’ relates to how busy our minds are and the fact that it, as monkeys jump from one object to another so our minds jump from one thought to another. It is not until we begin meditation and attempt to quieten the mind that we realise how our minds are filled with negative and positive thoughts and memories and will constantly interrupt our meditation.

Interruptions occur in many guises; it may be a sound from outside, physical pain, memories and thoughts or anything that negates natural meditation. The best way to deal with these interruptions is to accept them, let them go in their own time and bring your attention back to your breathing.

As you continue to practice, you find that concentration levels increase, your meditative state will become deeper and the monkey mind will dissipate. Some mediation sessions will better than other sessions but ultimately, you will be making progress; it is important to be remain consitent and patient.

Initially, you mend tend to force or control mediatation and this negates any positive progression you have made. The goal is to be kind to your body and relax and then be kind to your mind; we constantly work our minds too hard and through correct mediatation techniques we can give the mind a rest. If we give meditation priority and invest in the time it is an invetsment in our future with regard to our spiritual, emotional and physical well being and ultimately realignment of our energy centres.

Filed under: Meditation